Workshop, Leeds 2018: The Future of FEPOW Research – Call for Papers

RFHG are delighted to be co-organising a one-day workshop, to be held at the University of Leeds on 19 March 2018. We really interested to hear from potential speakers – particularly anybody working in ‘new’ or understudied geographies and themes related to the experience (or memory) of captivity across Southeast Asia and the Far East during the Second World War.

 

Future Memories: Where next for Far East Prisoner of War studies?

19 March 2018

University of Leeds

in partnership with Researching FEPOW History Group (RFHG)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Drawing on the broad theme of captivity across Southeast Asia and the Far East, this one-day symposium aims to be a ‘seed’ event for larger projects planned to mark the 75th anniversary of VJ Day (2020).

Proposals are invited for 15-minute papers covering, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • New perspectives, including transgenerational memory, perpetration, reconciliation, marginalised or ‘secret’/‘forgotten’ histories, influence of the Far Eastern experience on subsequent POWs in Korea and Vietnam
  • Geographies and communities, including lesser-known geographies of captivity, military POWs, romushas, civilian internees, ‘comfort’ women
  • Impact and engagement, including educational initiatives, exhibitions or memorial work, the role of third-sector organisations in developing impact,
  • Making and marking memory, through life-writing, fictional depictions of Far Eastern captivity, creative responses, transnational connections

Submission

Please submit 250-word abstracts plus a 50-word biography to Emily Sharp (futurememories2018@gmail.com) by 4 February 2018. We will notify you of acceptance by 15 February at the latest.

Postgraduate and early career bursaries

To support the work of early career researchers in the field, a limited number of bursaries will be available from RFHG to contribute towards the travel expenses of PGR/ECR speakers. Please note in your submission if you would like to be considered for a bursary, and why you think you should be offered one.

For all enquiries, please contact: futurememories2018@gmail.com

You can also download the Call for Papers here.

Legacies of Captivity: last few places remaining!

We are absolutely thrilled with the response to the conference launch…However, it does mean that we only have a few places  remaining for the 6th International FEPOW History Conference.  It’s all taking place in Liverpool, 9 – 11 June 2017…

Just some of our confirmed speakers include:

Jeya Jeyadurai (Changi Museum, Singapore)

Jon Cooper (TAAP)

John Cardwell and Emma Nichols (University of Cambridge)

Anne Wheeler (A War Story)

Stephen Walton (IWM)

Frank Taylor (Borneo tours)

Rod Beattie (Thai-Burma Railway Centre)

Flora Chong (ALPHA Education, Toronto)

It’s sure to be fabulous – don’t miss it!!! To make sure of your place, you can download a registration form here.

Conference places filling fast!

There are still places available for the 6th International FEPOW History Conference – but do send in your reigstration form as soon as you can!

A  great range of international experts will be covering Singapore, Thailand, Borneo, exciting new digitisation projects, the effects of PTSD on veterans and their families and much, more more – we really do hope that you can join us for what promises to be another inspiring, moving and fascinating weekend.

‘For me a lot of the value in the RFHG conferences have been the small snippets of information & new ideas where to look – as well of course building relationships over time with people’ (Walter Tuttlebee).

New book – by Dr Hilary Custance Green

Surviving the Death Railway: A POW’s Memoir and Letters from Home

Flyer SDR

Men captive in the Far East in WWII and their families in Britain lived separate, and unspeakably stressful lives for three and a half years. Surviving the Death Railway: A POW’s Memoir and Letters from Home combines documents from both fronts to tell their story.

Barry, a young captain, and the 68 Royal Signals linemen under his command arrived in Malaya while it was still at peace. The men, mainly reservists with some regular soldiers – Dunkirk survivors, built lines through the jungles of Malaya until they were all captured at the Fall of Singapore.

In Britain, Barry’s wife Phyllis, had collected addresses for the families of the men before they disappeared behind a wall of silence. For the duration of the war and after she kept in touch with the wives, mothers, grandparents and others. She received letters – from the tenements of Glasgow to the East End of London – telling of their fears, hopes and concerns.

At the end of the war, Barry and Phyllis got in touch with all the bereaved relatives and most of the survivors, as the men tried to track down their missing friends and rebuild their family lives.

In later life Barry wrote his memoirs of life as a prisoner of the Japanese, mainly on the Thailand-Burma Railway. This is full of the details of survival, both of the drudge and disease of the up-river camps and the contrasts between the hospital wards and theatre fun,towards the end of that captivity, in the base camps.

Remembering captivity across Southeast Asia and the Far East during the Second World War