Category Archives: Researching FEPOW History

Workshop, Leeds 2018: The Future of FEPOW Research – Call for Papers

RFHG are delighted to be co-organising a one-day workshop, to be held at the University of Leeds on 19 March 2018. We really interested to hear from potential speakers – particularly anybody working in ‘new’ or understudied geographies and themes related to the experience (or memory) of captivity across Southeast Asia and the Far East during the Second World War.

 

Future Memories: Where next for Far East Prisoner of War studies?

19 March 2018

University of Leeds

in partnership with Researching FEPOW History Group (RFHG)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Drawing on the broad theme of captivity across Southeast Asia and the Far East, this one-day symposium aims to be a ‘seed’ event for larger projects planned to mark the 75th anniversary of VJ Day (2020).

Proposals are invited for 15-minute papers covering, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • New perspectives, including transgenerational memory, perpetration, reconciliation, marginalised or ‘secret’/‘forgotten’ histories, influence of the Far Eastern experience on subsequent POWs in Korea and Vietnam
  • Geographies and communities, including lesser-known geographies of captivity, military POWs, romushas, civilian internees, ‘comfort’ women
  • Impact and engagement, including educational initiatives, exhibitions or memorial work, the role of third-sector organisations in developing impact,
  • Making and marking memory, through life-writing, fictional depictions of Far Eastern captivity, creative responses, transnational connections

Submission

Please submit 250-word abstracts plus a 50-word biography to Emily Sharp (futurememories2018@gmail.com) by 4 February 2018. We will notify you of acceptance by 15 February at the latest.

Postgraduate and early career bursaries

To support the work of early career researchers in the field, a limited number of bursaries will be available from RFHG to contribute towards the travel expenses of PGR/ECR speakers. Please note in your submission if you would like to be considered for a bursary, and why you think you should be offered one.

For all enquiries, please contact: futurememories2018@gmail.com

You can also download the Call for Papers here.

Legacies of Captivity: last few places remaining!

We are absolutely thrilled with the response to the conference launch…However, it does mean that we only have a few places  remaining for the 6th International FEPOW History Conference.  It’s all taking place in Liverpool, 9 – 11 June 2017…

Just some of our confirmed speakers include:

Jeya Jeyadurai (Changi Museum, Singapore)

Jon Cooper (TAAP)

John Cardwell and Emma Nichols (University of Cambridge)

Anne Wheeler (A War Story)

Stephen Walton (IWM)

Frank Taylor (Borneo tours)

Rod Beattie (Thai-Burma Railway Centre)

Flora Chong (ALPHA Education, Toronto)

It’s sure to be fabulous – don’t miss it!!! To make sure of your place, you can download a registration form here.

Conference places filling fast!

There are still places available for the 6th International FEPOW History Conference – but do send in your reigstration form as soon as you can!

A  great range of international experts will be covering Singapore, Thailand, Borneo, exciting new digitisation projects, the effects of PTSD on veterans and their families and much, more more – we really do hope that you can join us for what promises to be another inspiring, moving and fascinating weekend.

‘For me a lot of the value in the RFHG conferences have been the small snippets of information & new ideas where to look – as well of course building relationships over time with people’ (Walter Tuttlebee).

Latest RFHG newsletter now available

Our latest newsletter is now available online: RFHG Newsletter

This issue includes news on the launch of our next conference in July 2017 (download a registration form here: RFHC2017RegistrationForm), plus updates on FEPOW research projects, book updates and news on Cambridge University’s Changi digitistion project.

If you have any articles, project updates or news that you would like us to include in the next issue – contact us, we’d love to hear from you!

 

 

Duncan Bannatyne

Forgotten Heroes

BBC 1 Thursday 5th November 09:15

Former Dragons’ Den businessman Duncan Bannatyne views rare documents which shed light on his father’s experiences as a prisoner of war in the Far East. Presenters Sophie Raworth and Andy Torbet are also joined by a veteran who endured years of forced labour in the same prison camps as Duncan’s dad.

Duncans Father was FEPOW  William Bannattyne, Pte, 2980214. At the end of the war he was held at the Fukuoka #17 Camp in Omuta, Kyushu, Japan, where he worked as a slave for the Mitsui Corporation Zinc Foundy.

HRH Prince Philip the Duke of Edinburgh and Far East POWs

First contact between HRH Prince Philip the Duke of Edinburgh and Far East POWs
August 1945 – Tokyo

To mark the VJ Day 70 events we are reproducing the following extract taken from Prince Philip’s speech at the May 1974 National Federation of FEPOW Clubs and Associations 23rd national conference held in Blackpool. This was later published in the June/July 1974 issue of ‘FEPOW Forum’, the official magazine of the London FEPOW Club.
Reasons for Survival
Luck plays a very big part in ordinary life, but in war the element of luck is literally VITAL. Since I was invited to attend this reunion, I have been looking into the appalling story of POWs in the Far East and I can only say that I blessed my luck that I was not one of them.
I was fortunate enough, during a visit to Thailand some years ago, to see the famous bridge and I took the opportunity to lay a wreath at the camp cemetery, now beautifully looked after by the Imperial War Graves Commission.
I believe that many people assume that the POWs in the Far East were kept either in Singapore or in Siam. In fact, at the end of the war, prisoners were found in Rangoon, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Sumatra, Java, Siam, Saigon, Borneo, Macassar, Hong Kong, Formosa, Korea, Manchuria and Japan. So far as the British were concerned the major concentrations were 7,000 in Singapore, 13,000 in Siam, 9,000 in Japan and 2,300 in Saigon.
It seems to be one of the peculiarities of human existence that there is always a good side and a bad side to everything we do. In war this contrast becomes even more marked as it brings out both the best and worst in people. This is so brilliantly illustrated by the comradeship and self-sacrifice of the Prisoners of War and the inhuman brutality of those who held them captive in the Far East.
My only personal contact with Prisoners of War in the Far East was when I was serving on the destroyer ‘HMS Whelp’ in the British Pacific Fleet. In August 1945 we found ourselves part of the escort for the flagships of the American and British Pacific Fleets on our way to Japan immediately after her capitulation. The two battleships, ‘Duke of York’ and ‘Missouri’ escorted by four US and two British destroyers, approached the Japanese coast and with considerable caution anchored for the night in Sagami Bay at the entrance of Tokyo Harbour. Suddenly, just before dusk, there was a lot of activity amongst the guard boats and later on we learned that two swimmers had been picked up. It then turned out that two Royal Marine POWs, who had escaped from their camp near Tokyo the day before, were walking along the coast when they saw, to their considerable astonishment, a fleet of Allied Ships and promptly decided swim off and join them. We felt this was a splendid welcome and we sailed to Tokyo, determined to get all of the other prisoners out as soon as possible.
Owing to one thing and another, the evacuation of prisoners could not get started quite as quickly as we would have liked but within a few days the two British destroyers were ferrying released POWs from the shore to some escort carriers which had been made ready to receive them. In spite of the surrender ceremonies, it was this job of providing the first step to freedom of these prisoners that made me realise that the war was over at last. It was a moving experience. Many of the ex-prisoners happened to be sailors and as we gave them the usual cups of tea in the wardroom and the messes, we just sat in silence as we thought what this moment must have meant to them and many guests and hosts were quite unashamed to shed a tear.
Next year it will be 30 years since your captivity came to an end. All of you suffered in one way or another and many of you are now getting on in years. I believe the nation has a very special responsibility for your welfare in old age. I am quite sure that the Far East Prisoners of War Association will see to it that no-one in sickness, old age or distress will ever be forgotten or neglected.