Tag Archives: Internees of the Japanese

D-Day

In honour of the D-Day commemorations, Martin Percival writes…

The 6th June 2019 sees the 75th anniversary of D Day. The focus, quite rightly, is on Europe. What’s interesting though is to understand when and how the news was received by the POWs in the Far East and the impact it had upon their morale.

My father, Frank Percival, was captured in Singapore in February 1942 and was a member of one of the early work parties that headed up country to Thailand in June that year.

Upon returning home in October 1945, contrary to Army orders, the story of his captivity was published in the local newspapers in North West London – the Willesden Chronicle and the Kilburn Times. He told me when I was a teenager that as a young man, before he joined the Army in 1939, he had aspirations to be a journalist. I have often wondered if this piece, written on the ship home, was an attempt at fulfilling his career aspirations.This piece was re-published  in full with some additional photographs on Ron Taylor’s excellent Far Eastern Heroes website – see below:

http://www.far-eastern-heroes.org.uk/Your_Gods_Stronger_Than_Ours/

The piece reveals that the news about D Day was already circulating in Thailand as early as 9th June 1944 – just 3 days after the allied invasion of France. Although not mentioned in my father’s article, the news was received via ‘canaries’ – secret radios hidden in mess tins and other items to help to disguise them. If found the men held responsible by the Japanese risked death by beheading. The section on D Day and receiving news on the progress of the war from outside is as follows:

‘Most prison camps possessed excellent news facilities. In the camp in which I was interned in 1944 we knew full details of “D” Day on 9th June. Towards the end however things deteriorated, mainly as a result of the frequent searches carried out by the Japanese. But this was compensated for, in some measure, by the leaflets which occasionally came into our possession printed in Burmese, Chinese, Japanese and Siamese. We ware easily able to follow the course of the War from these, aided by excellent sketch maps printed on their reverse sides.’

My father told me that these communications were an incredible boost to morale – and that especially the news on D Day helped the POWs to believe that maybe there was now an end insight.

Connie Suverkropp: Dutch Civilian Internee

Dr Bernice Archer writes…

It is with great sadness that I report the death of Connie Suverkropp.

019_FEPOW_HI_RES-3517
Connie (right) speaking with Bernice at the RFHG conference in 2015. Photo courtesy of LSTM/Brian Roberts © 2015

Some of you may remember Connie and her sister Else attending the RFHG conference in Liverpool in 2015 where Connie told her story of internment by the Japanese in Java during the Second World War.

Connie was just twelve years old when she was interned with her two younger sisters, Else aged 5 and Kathy aged 2, in Tjihapit Camp and Struiswijk Prison in Java. Her two older brothers (aged 14 and 15) were interned with the men in Tjikudapateuh. Their mother, suffering from T.B. was interned in a Japanese hospital. She died just after the end of the war. Their father died in 1943 on the Burma Railway. Her grandfather died in Ambarawa Camp and her grandmother in Bloemenkamp.

So Connie became a mother to these two younger sisters who she struggled courageously to care for and educate while at the same time, as she was no longer considered a child by the Japanese, she had to work in the camps.

Connie Suverkropp 1948
Kathy, Connie and Else (from left to right) in 1948. Courtesy of the Suverkropp family.
Connie Suverkropp 2015
Kathy, Connie and Else (from left to right) in 2015. Photo courtesy of Netherlands War Graves Foundation/Rob Gieling © 2015

Thanks to Connie’s efforts all three sisters survived the gruelling time in the camps, both Else and Kathy survive her and her spirit, strength and courage live on in them and in her children and grandchildren and her wider family.

Throughout her adult life Connie was determined both to honour the memory of her parents who she missed so much and also to ensure that this dreadful part of Dutch history would not be forgotten.  Her efforts were recognised on 14 November 2007 when she was awarded the  Knight of the Order of Orange-Nassau.The statement made by mayor E.C. Bakker of Hilversum, in Museum Bronbeek (Arnhem) at the occasion of her decoration said: (a précis translation from Dutch to English by Connie’s brother-in-law Derk HilleRisLambers )

For many years of work Mrs Suverkropp focused on an accounting of history that reflects, and does justice to, the experience of the Dutch in the occupied Dutch East Indies during World War 2 – a history which she lived and remembers herself, and which dramatically affected her own family, and which has formed her as a person.

Connie has contributed by serving in the board of the “Foundation Guest Lecturers on WW-2, South-East Asia” (Stichting Gastdocenten WO II Werkgroep Zuid-Oost Azië). The Foundation offers guest lectures on history in schools in the Netherlands.

She made a special effort to get Dutch-Indonesian historic facts integrated into the curriculum History of the Netherlands in secondary schools: through special projects with the Royal Tropical Institute, and exhibits in the educational museum Museon. She also gave lectures on the subject in schools in Japan.

Connie was active in the Film Foundation Japanese Occupation of DEI.

With her activities she helped open the eyes of many Dutch students to this special part of history, Dutch history, of the Dutch East Indies. She has served the Dutch Indonesian community through her efforts to prevent their history from being swept under the rug, and forgotten.

 

STANLEY INTERNMENT CAMP – REUNION and GATHERING

STANLEY INTERNMENT CAMP – REUNION & GATHERING Hong Kong
30 November – 6 December 2015

Following the highly successful reunion in 2011 Geoff Emerson, resident of Hong Kong, is organising another Stanley Reunion/Gathering this year.  Geoff is the author of the book Hong Kong Internment 1942-1945: Life in the Japanese Civilian Camp at Stanley.

(Tentative Itinerary – as at 15 June 2015 – subject to change)

  • 30 Nov. Monday Arrive & Check-in Hotel.
  • 1 Dec. Tuesday 10:30 a.m. leave hotel. Welcome Lunch. After lunch, visit Stanley Military Cemetery.
  • 2 Dec. Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Day in Stanley – St Stephen’s College; Lunch at the Correctional Services Club; after lunch, visit Stanley Prison grounds.
  • 3 Dec. Thursday Free day. Evening – dinner hosted by George Cautherley.
  • 4 Dec. Friday 10:00 a.m. Guided walk of Wong Nei Chong Gap battle site. Evening – Chinese dinner.
  • 5 Dec. Saturday 9: 30 a.m. Visit to Hong Kong Observatory, Kowloon. Lunch – dim sum near the Observatory.
  • 6 Dec. Sunday 9:30 a.m. Attend the Canadian memorial service at the Commonwealth War Graves cemetery, Chai Wan, HK Island. Farewell lunch.
  • 7 Dec. Monday Check-out of hotel

For full details and updates please contact G. C. Emerson

Or complete the enquiry form below: